A- A A+

Contact us: 01342 831348

 

Intensive interaction

We are one of the very few schools in the UK where teachers are specially trained to deliver intensive interaction – a technique designed to help pupils with severe and profound learning difficulties.

Through repetitive familiar social exchanges with an attentive, interactive partner, we work on improving pupils’ social interaction and non-verbal communication skills, and encourage them to engage with others.

Over time, we find this approach makes a huge difference to childrens’ overall happiness, as well as their ability to get along with others.

J is a pupil at St Piers with epilepsy and severe learning difficulties. After a number of incidents where she’d been found hitting staff and other children, we referred her to one of our play specialists.

The specialist carried out individual intensive interaction sessions with J and discovered that she was gesturing for clapping games and activities that involved pressure being applied to the palms of her hands and fingertips.

Devising a number of interactive games, we were not only able to give J the sensory input she needed, but provide residential staff with a way of interacting with the girl in a more positive way.

Within a few weeks, the hitting had stopped and J was much happier as a result.
One student's experience of intensive interaction

Sensory therapy

Interacting and communicating are key for many students here, which is why our sensory therapy gives students the chance to express themselves.

Read more about our sensory therapy

Feedback from parents

Quote Icon I am very pleased with my son. He has made new friends and hobbies. The school makes him happy to do lots of things. He is doing really well at school and learning.
Parent

Image of helpline numbers

  Cyber Essentials    Youth Sports Trust International School Award web compliance web complianceYoung Epilepsy Logo

  St. Piers School is part of Young Epilepsy. Young Epilepsy is the operating name of The National Centre for Young People with Epilepsy (NCYPE)  

We use cookies to improve our website and your experience when using it. Cookies used for the essential operation of the site have already been set. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our Privacy Policy.

I accept cookies from this site
EU Cookie Directive plugin by www.channeldigital.co.uk